Importance Of Being Selfish

I was first introduced to Ayn Rand at the age of 15, when I read The Fountainhead and, like most young Rand readers, was influenced to the point of being thunderstruck by her philosophy. This led to a flurry of reading Ayn Rand books: We The Living, The Night of January 16th, Atlas Shrugged. These were novels of ideas, in which Rand, in her own words, aimed for “the portrayal of a moral ideal”. Rand espoused a noble individualism, a “selfishness” and “egotism” that lead to the good of society as a whole. She believed man to be heroic, armed with reason and capable of great things when pursuing his own happiness.

In all her writings, Rand’s authorial voice was clear and unmistakable. She shone out of the pages of her works. Very soon after the publication of The Fountainhead in 1943, Rand had become a cult figure, with a dedicated group of followers and an equally vehement group of detractors. She was regarded a genius by some (or, in the case of her disciples, “the greatest human being who has ever lived”), and a “reactionary crackpot” by others.

It is a matter of some surprise then, that Anne C. Heller’s Ayn Rand and the World She Made, published 28 years after Rand’s death, is the first objective and investigative biography of this fascinating woman. The only previous biography, The Passion of Ayn Rand, published in 1986, was written partly in the form of a memoir by Barbara Branden, Rand’s friend and disciple, and the wife of Rand’s young lover, Nathaniel Branden.

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